After ex-England and Manchester United footballer Rio Ferdinand announced that he was going to turn his attentions to boxing in order to let off a little extra steam and gain back that competitive edge, the sporting media have made some wild claims and assumptions.

We’re going to clear up these claims and breakdown the likely truth of Rio’s boxing career.

 

What Weight Class Will He Fight At?

First things first, what weight class will Rio be fighting at?

Rio’s weight when a professional footballer was 87kg/192lbs. This means that as a healthy power athlete he sits within the Cruiserweight division.

Many have said that he could potentially fight Tony Bellew, or even move up to heavyweight and fight Anthony Joshua. One thing that you have to remember is that Rio is a smart man with sporting knowledge. He’s also hired true professionals of the boxing and conditioning game.

With this in mind, the smart and most likely strategy is to get Rio down to the light heavyweight division or lower. This would give him a natural weight advantage over his opponents post-weigh-ins.

Seeing as Rio isn’t a professional boxer, it makes perfect sense to give him as many advantages as possible. It also shouldn’t be too hard for Rio to lose roughly 8kg. After all, a weigh-in isn’t like the start of a football match.

For Manchester United and England Rio had to be healthy 24/7 due to the amount of games that would come back to back. However a boxer only has to reach an unhealthy weight for a day or so.

If Rio starves himself prior to weigh-ins and loses any unnecessary muscle and body fat, then he’ll comfortably make the light-heavyweight division and quite possibly super-middleweight at a stretch.

Conor McGregor recently said that he would gain roughly 9kgs between the weigh-ins and actual fight vs Mayweather. This suggests that Rio will probabaly fight at light-heavyweight. However the most logical solution may be for Rio to keep training for an extended period of time, perhaps 6 months, get closer to the middle-weight division and have a major size advantage over his opponents in order to maximize his chances of success which are currently very low.

This seems to be exactly what the Ferdinand camp is doing after seeing a recent image of a very lean Rio:

 

Potential Opponents

The first thing we can rule out is a bout between McGregor, Haye, Bellew, Joshua, Ward, etc.

The big guns just won’t see the benefit in this fight. Financially it wouldn’t even make sense, people just about bought into Mcgregor vs Mayweather, no one’s going to believe that Rio can do any serious damage against elite level professionals.

Rio will take the same approach as Cricketer turned boxer Andrew Flintoff.

Flintoff boxed four 2 minute rounds against American Richard Dawson and won on points even though he was knocked down in the 2nd round. Dawson was hand picked by the Flintoff team due to the height advantage and lower skill level. We can expect the Ferdinand camp to do the same, especially as Rio will be able to come down in weight, whereas Flintoff boxed at Heavyweight.

Rio’s most likely opponent will be an entry level boxer with a few losses on his record and a very low knockout ratio. It’s also likely that it will be a middleweight, who can make super-middleweight and would gladly do so in order to land a big pay day.

This puts as many advantages as possible in Ferdinand’s favor, however most boxers are going to take the bait due to the obvious benefits both financially and for fame.

After ex-England and Manchester United footballer Rio Ferdinand announced that he was going to turn his attentions to boxing in order to let off a little extra steam and gain back that competitive edge, the sporting media have made some wild claims and assumptions.

We're going to clear up these claims and breakdown the likely truth of Rio's boxing career.

 

What Weight Class Will He Fight At?

First things first, what weight class will Rio be fighting at?

Rio's weight when a professional footballer was 87kg/192lbs. This means that as a healthy power athlete he sits within the Cruiserweight division.

Many have said that he could potentially fight Tony Bellew, or even move up to heavyweight and fight Anthony Joshua. One thing that you have to remember is that Rio is a smart man with sporting knowledge. He's also hired true professionals of the boxing and conditioning game.

With this in mind, the smart and most likely strategy is to get Rio down to the light heavyweight division or lower. This would give him a natural weight advantage over his opponents post-weigh-ins.

Seeing as Rio isn't a professional boxer, it makes perfect sense to give him as many advantages as possible. It also shouldn't be too hard for Rio to lose roughly 8kg. After all, a weigh-in isn't like the start of a football match.

For Manchester United and England Rio had to be healthy 24/7 due to the amount of games that would come back to back. However a boxer only has to reach an unhealthy weight for a day or so.

If Rio starves himself prior to weigh-ins and loses any unnecessary muscle and body fat, then he'll comfortably make the light-heavyweight division and quite possibly super-middleweight at a stretch.

Conor McGregor recently said that he would gain roughly 9kgs between the weigh-ins and actual fight vs Mayweather. This suggests that Rio will probabaly fight at light-heavyweight. However the most logical solution may be for Rio to keep training for an extended period of time, perhaps 6 months, get closer to the middle-weight division and have a major size advantage over his opponents in order to maximize his chances of success which are currently very low.

This seems to be exactly what the Ferdinand camp is doing after seeing a recent image of a very lean Rio:

 

Potential Opponents

The first thing we can rule out is a bout between McGregor, Haye, Bellew, Joshua, Ward, etc.

The big guns just won't see the benefit in this fight. Financially it wouldn't even make sense, people just about bought into Mcgregor vs Mayweather, no one's going to believe that Rio can do any serious damage against elite level professionals.

Rio will take the same approach as Cricketer turned boxer Andrew Flintoff.

Flintoff boxed four 2 minute rounds against American Richard Dawson and won on points even though he was knocked down in the 2nd round. Dawson was hand picked by the Flintoff team due to the height advantage and lower skill level. We can expect the Ferdinand camp to do the same, especially as Rio will be able to come down in weight, whereas Flintoff boxed at Heavyweight.

Rio's most likely opponent will be an entry level boxer with a few losses on his record and a very low knockout ratio. It's also likely that it will be a middleweight, who can make super-middleweight and would gladly do so in order to land a big pay day.

This puts as many advantages as possible in Ferdinand's favor, however most boxers are going to take the bait due to the obvious benefits both financially and for fame.