As much as fashion designers wouldn’t want to admit it, the music industry and the NBA do pretty much control what the male world wear. We say “the NBA” and not just the players because the best fashion can be seen courtside.as people in the front rows know it’s a great chance to be seen, hence why so many jump around after mediocre dunks in exchange for camera time and reaction replays.

Rappers have specifically controlled fashion for around 2 decades now and music videos are as much about paid product placement as they are about the music. If a top 1% rapper wears a certain shoe, chances are it’ll go out of stock in a few months. Then cheaper versions will be released as close replicas using lesser materials.

It’s funny how the NBA controls male fashion and not other sports. NFL is bigger nationally and Soccer is bigger globally, yet male fashion seems to begin in the NBA. The reason for this is the nature of NBA arenas and the more casual vibe of the sport itself.

Go to a soccer game in the UK dressed in your best clothes, and expect to leave covered in beer after thousands of people bump into you and jump around at every given moment.

An NBA game is more like the theatre. A place where you can sit back, relax and watch the show unfold in front of you. The arenas are also much smaller than most due to a smaller playing area. This makes being seen by the cameras extremely easy.

In a football or soccer stadium, there may be 90,000 people and you’d never expect to be seen even though you know the cameras are there.

There’s also a more obvious reason as to why the NBA runs male fashion. In order to sit in the front row of any sports stadium it doesn’t cost anything extra, since the field is just too large for it to matter.

In the NBA however courtside, just like ringside in boxing, is considered a money move. Therefore it suggests that the people who can be seen on camera have money. Since money and fashion have always gone together it creates a very logical correlation.

This is somewhat seen in tennis. Tennis like basketball has smaller stadiums, however the fashion is set in stone. Tennis is a formal occasion and you’re more likely to see a row of men wearing open shirt suits than any expression of unique style.

Of course we also have movies and fashion shows to thank for male fashion trends, but movies with fashion statements don’t come along all too often, and fashion shows are meaningless unless the NBA and music industry wears what’s on show.

We’ve also seen the likes of McGregor having a real impact on male fashion, but as he’s really the only modern fighter doing this on a global scale, it’s hard to say it’s a trend that will continue within the fight game.

Examples of rappers and the NBA deciding what entire generations will wear can be found throughout the last 20 years in abundance.

 

The Brown Camel Coat

Seen courtside at nearly every NBA game, with Steph Curry, Kobe and LeBron even wearing one to and from the stadium.

 

Red Salvatore Ferragamo Coat

Worn most famously by James Harden, which led to a string of courtsiders wearing the same coat, or at least a different colored version of it. These coats are always paired with chelsea boots and a white tee, it’s become a very predictable outfit.

 

Drake’s Hotline Bling Turtleneck

After this song it became socially acceptable for the masses to wear turtlenecks. This was later followed up by a turtleneck and shades combination in the song “No Frauds”.

 

Lil Wayne’s Sneakers

When Wayne was king of the music world colorful high-tops began to take over. As did the iconic black sneakers with a white sole. After he was seen wearing them in the Lollipop video this trend exploded and hasn’t stopped yet. He certainly wasn’t the first to wear them, but as the world’s most famous rapper at the time, he had the power to make a global fashion change.

Kanye’s Polo’s, Backpacks & Aviator Shades

As mentioned in Drake’s “Know Yourself” Kanye set the preppy trend of polo’s and backpacks followed by aviator shades in the music video “Stronger” which truly were a global phenomenon.

 

Wilt Chamberlain’s Muscle Tee With Chain

This combination was copied throughout America and is even seen in Family Guy via the character Jerome.

 

Future & Fedora’s

Future is actually releasing his own hat-line since he’s made fedora’s so iconic.

 

The male fashion world certainly has it’s roots in the music industry and sports, specifically with rappers and in the NBA community. Over the summer people were obsessed with what Lonzo Ball was wearing on his feet as he switched from brand to brand.

This trend is only going to continue as brands realize the power these communities currently have. The environments and methods of these industries are simply set up for fashion to be showcased, and it seems to only strengthen their popularity among fans.

In fact fashion has become an integral part of both industries and nearly as important as the crafts themselves.

As much as fashion designers wouldn't want to admit it, the music industry and the NBA do pretty much control what the male world wear. We say "the NBA" and not just the players because the best fashion can be seen courtside.as people in the front rows know it's a great chance to be seen, hence why so many jump around after mediocre dunks in exchange for camera time and reaction replays.

Rappers have specifically controlled fashion for around 2 decades now and music videos are as much about paid product placement as they are about the music. If a top 1% rapper wears a certain shoe, chances are it'll go out of stock in a few months. Then cheaper versions will be released as close replicas using lesser materials.

It's funny how the NBA controls male fashion and not other sports. NFL is bigger nationally and Soccer is bigger globally, yet male fashion seems to begin in the NBA. The reason for this is the nature of NBA arenas and the more casual vibe of the sport itself.

Go to a soccer game in the UK dressed in your best clothes, and expect to leave covered in beer after thousands of people bump into you and jump around at every given moment.

An NBA game is more like the theatre. A place where you can sit back, relax and watch the show unfold in front of you. The arenas are also much smaller than most due to a smaller playing area. This makes being seen by the cameras extremely easy.

In a football or soccer stadium, there may be 90,000 people and you'd never expect to be seen even though you know the cameras are there.

There's also a more obvious reason as to why the NBA runs male fashion. In order to sit in the front row of any sports stadium it doesn't cost anything extra, since the field is just too large for it to matter.

In the NBA however courtside, just like ringside in boxing, is considered a money move. Therefore it suggests that the people who can be seen on camera have money. Since money and fashion have always gone together it creates a very logical correlation.

This is somewhat seen in tennis. Tennis like basketball has smaller stadiums, however the fashion is set in stone. Tennis is a formal occasion and you're more likely to see a row of men wearing open shirt suits than any expression of unique style.

Of course we also have movies and fashion shows to thank for male fashion trends, but movies with fashion statements don't come along all too often, and fashion shows are meaningless unless the NBA and music industry wears what's on show.

We've also seen the likes of McGregor having a real impact on male fashion, but as he's really the only modern fighter doing this on a global scale, it's hard to say it's a trend that will continue within the fight game.

Examples of rappers and the NBA deciding what entire generations will wear can be found throughout the last 20 years in abundance.

 

The Brown Camel Coat

Seen courtside at nearly every NBA game, with Steph Curry, Kobe and LeBron even wearing one to and from the stadium.

 

Red Salvatore Ferragamo Coat

Worn most famously by James Harden, which led to a string of courtsiders wearing the same coat, or at least a different colored version of it. These coats are always paired with chelsea boots and a white tee, it's become a very predictable outfit.

 

Drake's Hotline Bling Turtleneck

After this song it became socially acceptable for the masses to wear turtlenecks. This was later followed up by a turtleneck and shades combination in the song "No Frauds".

 

Lil Wayne's Sneakers

When Wayne was king of the music world colorful high-tops began to take over. As did the iconic black sneakers with a white sole. After he was seen wearing them in the Lollipop video this trend exploded and hasn't stopped yet. He certainly wasn't the first to wear them, but as the world's most famous rapper at the time, he had the power to make a global fashion change.

Kanye's Polo's, Backpacks & Aviator Shades

As mentioned in Drake's "Know Yourself" Kanye set the preppy trend of polo's and backpacks followed by aviator shades in the music video "Stronger" which truly were a global phenomenon.

 

Wilt Chamberlain's Muscle Tee With Chain

This combination was copied throughout America and is even seen in Family Guy via the character Jerome.

 

Future & Fedora's

Future is actually releasing his own hat-line since he's made fedora's so iconic.

 

The male fashion world certainly has it's roots in the music industry and sports, specifically with rappers and in the NBA community. Over the summer people were obsessed with what Lonzo Ball was wearing on his feet as he switched from brand to brand.

This trend is only going to continue as brands realize the power these communities currently have. The environments and methods of these industries are simply set up for fashion to be showcased, and it seems to only strengthen their popularity among fans.

In fact fashion has become an integral part of both industries and nearly as important as the crafts themselves.